MACC Students Lend Helping Hands While Shaking Hands

The Belk College of Business Master in Accountancy (“MACC”) students recently combined forces with industry professionals to make a difference in the local community - while also networking with each other.

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Almost 20 MACC student, along with 16 professionals from Deloitte, KPMG, PwC, DHG, Elliott Davis, Sealed Air, GreerWalker, and Grant Thornton met at Classroom Central, a not-for-profit agency that collects and distributes free school supplies to underprivileged students.  The combine team rolled up their sleeves together to make encouraging notecards, pack pencil pouches, organize bulk warehouse items, and count cards for the kids.

“The volunteer event is a great way for our students who are looking for jobs to have as much exposure to the professionals as possible,” said Shirley Gomes,CPA and Associate Director of Belk College Graduate Student Services.  “In the MACC program, we strongly believe in the power of building your network, whether its alumni, recruiters, corporations or peers. This event enabled the students to develop this network while working alongside others for a cause.”  In this way, among others, Belk College MACC students have the exclusive opportunity to learn about the firms, firm culture, and profession.  

The Belk College group included students currently searching for jobs, and some of the professionals who attended may be recruiting for full-time offers soon.  The collaborative atmosphere of working together to help others is ideal for these participants, allowing them a head-start on networking.

Belk College of Business MACC program is proud to support Classroom Central, and happy to directly impact the educational experience of local disadvantaged youth.
 

Classroom Central, a local not-for-profit agency founded by the Charlotte Chamber and Carolina Panthers, collects and distributes free school supplies, helping students more effectively learn.  This organization serves almost 100,000 students and their teachers in 192 high-poverty schools in Charlotte-Mecklenburg, Iredell-Statesville, City of Kannapolis, Union, Gaston, and Lancaster, SC.  For thousands, basic learning tools are a luxury. In fact, more than 50% of the students in these school districts come from families that can't afford lunch, let alone school supplies.  

Interested to learn more?  macc.uncc.edu

 

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Date Published: 
Friday, September 1, 2017